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First taste: The Penfolds Collection 2016, including Penfolds Grange 2012

Peter Gago introduces The Penfolds Collection 2016

Penfolds officially launched The Penfolds Collection 2016 last week.  I caught up with the wines and Peter Gago Chief Winemaker at the London preview tasting on 29 September.  

The master blender was at pains to point out that the wines are made “not to a formula, but to a stylistic template.”   I very much felt the hand of history – Penfolds’ pedigree  – during this tasting. But it also seemed to me (thrillingly, I might add) that a greater premium was placed on sheer personality over polish in this, The Penfolds Collection 2016.  And structure preferred over opulence.  Gago summed up my thoughts when he observed of Grange 2012 “it’s an older style with modern day poise.”

My stand out wines this year were Yattarna 2014, Bin 128 Shiraz 2014 (Coonawarra). Bin 150 Marananga Shiraz 2014 (Barossa), Bin 407 2014, St Henri 2013, Bin 707 2014, Bin 389 2014 & Grange 2012.

Here are my notes, in each case preceded by Penfolds’ vintage report.

Penfolds Bin 51 Riesling 2016 (Eden Valley)

The vintage: The start of the growing season was about one week late with budburst and shoot growth relatively even across the region. Flowering started in October and lasted about one week. Spring and summer were very dry with rainfall well below average, which stretched depleted water resources. The mild summer with a lack of heat waves ensured the fruit was able to ripen evenly and develop desirable flavours without the threat of stressful heat events. The Woodbury Vineyard, from which fruit for this vintage release was sourced, stood out as a regional highlight.

My tasting note: very perfumed with lifted talc, lychee and spicy, sushi ginger notes which follow in the mouth together with orange blossom.  The aromatics give the palate a sense of roundness and reach, though grapefruit/well-focused grape-fruity acidity drives the palate. Long.  Very good.  12%

Penfolds Bin 311 Tumbarumba Chardonnay 2015 (Tumbarumba)

Vintage: Frost risk was greatly reduced in Tumbarumba due to warmer than average minimum temperatures for spring. Rainfall during winter and spring was minimal, reducing canopy growth. Above average summer rainfall (January was double the long-term average) increased the potential for Botrytis. However, careful vineyard management reduced disease risk. Temperatures through January/February were below average allowing the grapes to develop slowly, ensuring full flavour ripeness and retention of natural acidity.

Tasting note: as pale as the Riesling, though this wine was aged for 9 months in seasoned French oak barriques. With a degree more alcohol than the previous vintage this wine seems to rely more on its fruit rather than its lees for palate weight and I much prefer it for that.  Its silky white peach, just ripe apricot and juicy golden delicious have a subtle salty edge; the mineral finish is persistent.  My favourite Bin 311 of the recent crop.13.5%

Penfolds Reserve Bin 15A Chardonnay 2015 (Adelaide Hills)

Vintage: Autumn and winter rainfall were above the long-term averages. Rain stopped abruptly in early August with nothing more than light and infrequent showers observed throughout spring. A significant rainfall event in early January revitalised vineyards and gave vines a much needed boost throughout veraison. Mild days coupled with cool nights provided consistent conditions, resulting in high acid retention with even and steady sugar accumulation over the ripening phase. Harvest across most vineyards in the Adelaide Hills was compressed with the majority of the vineyards picked by the end of March

Tasting note: this vintage just bagged James Halliday’s Chardonnay Challenge Trophy.  It shows struck match, lime zest and toasty oak which follow through in the mouth, together with lemon custard creams and cashew.  With a bit of air, it opens up to reveal shy then silky white peach.  The gunflint/struck match note persists from top to toe.  Big toe – Bin 15A is very long and deep, with fresh acidity – good energy – and an almost granular, textural quality, which builds in the mouth.  Great stature, but already very expressive – zesty and complex. It was whole-bunch pressed incrementally into French barriques (40% new), each is a unique 225-litre natural ferment. This wine is fermented and matured (9 months) on solids and undergoes 100% malolactic fermentation (all natural). 13.0%

Penfolds Yattarna 2014

Regional sourcing: Derwent Valley and Central Highlands (Tasmania, 73%), Adelaide Hills (27%)

The vintage: Revitalising winter rainfalls replenished the Tasmanian and Adelaide Hills soil profiles for the start of the 2014 growing season. Tasmanian yields were reduced early in the growing season as a result of windy conditions during both flowering and fruit-set. Frost during this time also provided some challenges, but fortunately, Yattarna vineyards were largely spared. The ripening period in both regions was characterised by cool to mild conditions resulting in a later harvest. While the Adelaide Hills region experienced a significant rainfall event in mid-February, this had minimal impact. Due to the extended length of the growing season, fruit from both regions was able to reach full phenolic maturity with crisp acid retention, flavour and structure.

Tasting note: As you might expect from Tasmania, the Yattarna has a tighter nose and firmer palate than Bin 15A.  I loved its cool, sorbet-like delivery and sappy, juicy, yet controlled – very poised – palate of Apple Isle golden delicious with a little Adelaide Hills’ white peach.  Thanks go to its firm acid backbone for that cool focus.  Long and intense with subtle back palate flavours of earth/whetstone and deep-seated nutty oak building on a chewy finish.  Going back at the end I find honeycombe and oatmeal nuances too but, despite its New World clarity, with Tasmanian precision and structure, this wine is very much made for the long haul.  My pick of the Chardonnays for its sheer prowess. It was aged for 8 months in French oak barriques (70% new and 30% 1-y.o.) 13%

Penfolds Bin 2 2014

Regional sourcing: McLaren Vale, Barossa Valley, Langhorne Creek, Wrattonbully

Vintage: Above-average winter and early spring rainfall offered the vines in South Australia healthy soil moisture profiles for the growing season. Late spring and early summer were dry and warm with significant heat records being set. Warm weather prevailed during summer and throughout veraison, allowing grapes to develop evenly and with good intensity. These warm conditions came to an abrupt halt in the Barossa Valley and McLaren Vale in mid-February with a significant rainfall allowing for long slow ripening of the fruit in very good ripening conditions. Wrattonbully had a warm and generally dry ripening end to the season allowing for the development of strong varietal flavours.

Tasting note: I don’t recall Bin 2 featuring in this tasting during the last few years (or Bin 8).  Perhaps it’s a reflection of the upwards trajectory of prices?  Putting these more modestly priced wines in the same spotlight as the so-called Luxury and Icon range gives them a sprinkle of stardust, while keeping the lower price range of the collection within easier reach.  Anyway, I can understand why Gago was keen to whip through the first few wines and described Bin 2 (as it is currently showing) as “a dry red.” This blend of 82% Shiraz, 18% Mataro has bouncy jello black cherry fruit with cinnamon hints and mocha undertones. Quite juicy for Bin 2, though there’s some mataro grip to the finish.  It looked rather ordinary in this line up, though I think it will improve with time in bottle (it certainly used to age rather well). It was aged for 12 months in seasoned French and American oak barrels.  14.5%

Penfolds Bin 8 2014

Regional sourcing:  McLaren Vale, Barossa Valley, Wrattonbully, Padthaway, Coonawarra

Vintage: Above-average winter and early spring rainfall offered the vines in South Australia healthy soil moisture profiles for the growing season. Late spring and early summer were dry and warm with significant heat records being set. Warm weather prevailed during summer and throughout veraison, allowing grapes to develop evenly and with good intensity. These warm conditions came to an abrupt halt in the Barossa Valley and McLaren Vale in mid-February with a significant rainfall allowing for long slow ripening of the fruit in very good ripening conditions. Wrattonbully had a warm and generally dry ripening end to the season allowing for the development of strong varietal flavours.

Tasting note: whilst Bin 2 didn’t float my boat, Bin 8  – a blend of 52% Cabernet Sauvignon, 48% Shiraz – has much to commend it.  The Cabernet leads on nose and perfumed blackcurranty palate, with hints of bayleaf and, as it opens up, blueberry.  Fruity, yet with classy focus thanks to its high sheen polish (of both fruit and tannin).  Sappier blackberry gently teases out the mid-palate and washes juicily over the finish. Very well done – I liked the freshness, polish and lift.  Bin 8 was aged for 12 months in French Oak (5% new) and American Oak (6% new).  14.5%

Penfolds Bin 138 Shiraz Grenache Mataro 2014 (Barossa Valley)

Vintage: Above long-term average winter rainfall occurred throughout the Barossa Valley region providing adequate soil moisture for the upcoming growing season. It was a warm, dry start to spring with below average rainfall initiating budburst earlier than normal. Frost episodes were infrequent. The 2013 spring season was the windiest in 47 years in the Barossa, this coupled with cool nights, created variability with fruit-set reducing potential yield during the flowering period. 2014 brought high temperatures which reduced yields further during veraison for the fourth year in a row. A short heatwave caused the vines to shut down and slow grape maturation. The remainder of the growing season was warm and dry. This ensured desired flavour development and acid retention resulting in impressive fruit quality.

Tasting note: This blend of 64% Shiraz, 21% Grenache, 15% Mataro from a low yielding vintage is a roller coaster ride as the varietal flavours pipe up in turn.  I quite like the fact that this is a rather more raucous Bin 138 for it. Grenache, though just one barrel in five, mobs the nose.  Mob is a bit impolite, because it imparts an enticing perfume (aftershave?), with its spicy, soapy imperial leather.  On the palate, the Mataro runs with the spice (crushed peppercorns with grunt) and lends a touch of grip going through.  While the Grenache leads with red fruits, the Shiraz and Mataro narrow the focus onto black fruits – tight black currant and juicier berry.  Very good.  Lots of character.  It was aged for 12 months in seasoned French and American oak hogsheads. 14.5%

Incidentally, Gago revealed that this year Penfolds made its first 100% Grenache in 14 years from +100 year old vines.  As you know I’m a fan of Grenache so I look forward to tasting it.  The winemaker observed, although the 2002 looks like a 5 year old wine today it’s difficult to make Grenache every year – “you can end up with little colour and a very ordinary wine irrespective of yield and vine age.”

Penfolds Bin 128 Shiraz 2014 (Coonawarra)

Vintage: The second wettest winter recorded in 28 years ensured plenty of ground water reserves for the 2014 vintage. Continued spring rainfall was almost double the average for that period. Flowering occurred from the last week of November through to mid-December. Cold, wet and windy weather at flowering resulted in an uneven fruit-set with small berries affecting bunch weights. Temperatures during January and February were hot and dry with eight days of temperatures exceeding 40C. Hot weather accelerated ripening of many grape varieties, with harvest starting mid-February. The last grapes were picked the first week in May making the 2014 harvest one of the longest on record.

Tasting note: said longest harvest on record has produced one of my picks of the tasting – a very elegant Shiraz indeed.  It’s a deep hue, with subtle liquorice/anise and peppery undertones to its fresh, sapid blackberry and red cherry fruit and just a hint of mochachino oak. Ripe but present spicy tannins lend a bit of grip to the finish but, with the polish one might expect of a Cabernet-focused region, the overall impression is of elegance and finesse, line and length.  Terrific persistence, lovely freshness. Bin 128 was aged for 12 months in French oak hogsheads (26% new, 43% 1-y.o., 31% 2-y.o.) 14.5%

Penfolds Bin 28 Kalimna Shiraz 2014

Regional sourcing:  Barossa Valley, McLaren Vale, Langhorne Creek, Wrattonbully, Port Lincoln, Clare Valley (Port Lincoln?  If like me, you were wondering where that was, I just looked it up.  Apparently it’s on the Eyre Peninsula, to the west of Adelaide (the Limestone Coast is south east of Adelaide) and is known as the “Seafood Capital of Australia.” (It is the home of Coffin Bay Oysters which are seriously good!)

Vintage: Above-average winter and early spring rainfall offered the vines in South Australia healthy soil moisture profiles for the growing season. A warm and wet start to the spring season in McLaren Vale brought an early start to the season. A significant hail storm and high wind activity caused poor set during the flowering period. Late spring and summer were dry and warm with significant heat records being set. Warm weather prevailed during summer and throughout veraison, allowing grapes to develop evenly and with good intensity. These warm conditions came to an abrupt halt mid-February with a significant rainfall event producing a slow and even ripening process and an extended harvest.

Tasting note: though seasoned, the American oak (12 months, hogsheads) really dominates this wine at the moment.  It’s really quite oleaginous in texture with Piz Buin sun tan oil, malty biscuit and cola flavours;markedly more sucrosity than Bin 128 too (obviously a climate thing too).  Not my thing at all, but then one [wo]man’s meat…..I am sure with time the ripe, smooth blueberry, fleshy plum, blackcurrant/cassis which lie beneath will overcome the oak but, for now, it’s in an awkward place.  14.5%

Penfolds Bin 150 Marananga Shiraz 2014 (Marananga, Barossa Valley)

Vintage:  Above long-term average winter rainfall occurred throughout the Barossa Valley region providing adequate soil moisture for the upcoming growing season. It was a warm, dry start to spring with belowaverage rainfall initiating budburst earlier than normal. Frost episodes were infrequent. The 2013 spring season was the windiest in 47 years in the Barossa, this coupled with cool nights, created variability with fruit-set reducing potential yield during the flowering period. 2014 brought high temperatures reducing yields further during veraison for the fourth year in a row. A short heatwave caused the vines to shut down and slow grape maturation. The remainder of the growing season was warm and dry. This ensured desired flavour development and acid retention resulting in impressive fruit quality

Tasting note: I thought the 2013 was the best yet but the onwards upwards trajectory continues for this relatively new sub-regional addition to the portfolio.  Its dense fretwork of concentrated, very perfumed, inky, sweet fruit (a melange of juicy blueberry, loganberry and tarter rhubarb and dried red cherry) is interspersed with savoury liquorice, clove, smoked venison, leather, iodine and earth notes.  It’s an Old World/New World paradigm buster!  Fine but firmly textured iron filing tannins, a little dry on the finish, make for a slightly chewy finish but in a good way, which smacks of great ageing potential.  It also put me in mind of something Eben Sadie once said about liking the sensation – the scratch of seams – of inside-out clothing.  Marananga 2014 was aged for 14 months in French oak (30% new, 13% 1-y.o., 4% 2-y.o.) and American oak hogsheads and puncheons (30% new, 16% 1-y.o., 7% 2-y.o.) Gago told us Penfolds are using more and more (500l) puncheons.  Perhaps not as many as they’d like because, apparently, the problem is getting hold of them, also the puncheon cradles.  14.5%,

Penfolds Bin 407 Cabernet Sauvignon 2014

Regional sourcing:  Wrattonbully, McLaren Vale, Barossa Valley, Coonawarra, Clare Valley

Vintage: Above-average winter and early spring rainfall offered the vines in South Australia healthy soil moisture profiles for the growing season. Late spring and summer were dry and warm setting significant heat records. Warm weather prevailed during summer and throughout veraison, allowing grapes to develop evenly and with good flavour intensity. These warm conditions came to an abrupt halt in the Barossa Valley and McLaren Vale in mid-February with significant rainfall allowing for long, slow and optimal ripening of the fruit. Wrattonbully had a warm and generally dry ripening end to the season allowing the development of strong varietal flavours.

Tasting note: another stylish vintage of Bin 407.  It’s perfumed with sweet cassis and piquant dried herbs.  In the mouth it dances rather more steps as if to reinforce its mixed (regional) heritage – blackcurrant, a hint of blueberry, black olive, iodine, a touch of earth on the palate.  The tannins, ripe but present, bring a guiding hand to the fruit, cradling it through a long, fine finish with pretty, resonating dried herb piquancy.  An expressive Cabernet, generous of spirit without sacrificing line and lift. It was aged for 13 months in French oak (24% new) and American oak hogshead (10% new, 27% 1-y.o., 39% 2-y.o.) 14.5%

Penfolds RWT Shiraz 2014 (Barossa Valley)

Vintage: Above long-term average winter rainfall occurred throughout the Barossa Valley region providing adequate soil moisture for the growing season. It was a warm, dry start to spring with below-average rainfall initiating budburst earlier than normal. Frost episodes were infrequent. The 2013 spring season was the windiest in 47 years in the Barossa, this coupled with cool nights, created variability with fruit-set reducing potential yield during the flowering period. 2014 brought high temperatures reducing yields further during veraison for the fourth year in a row. A short heatwave caused the vines to shut down and slow grape maturation. The remainder of the growing season was warm and dry. This ensured desired flavour development and acid retention resulting in impressive fruit quality.

Tasting note: A deep but vibrant hue – lots of opacity – signals a sumptuous style, fleshy and polished with fine grained tannins and elegant sucrosity.  In the mouth it’s a smooth as velvet with sweet blackberry, juniper, anise and cinnamon accents – nice detail.  Lovely persistence too, maintaining brightness and vinosity all the way through, although I pick up some savoury notes too – hints of black olive and incipient roast chesnut.  Still that luscious fruit does the talking for now.  Lots going on here and lots of go – when I return to this wine at the end, the tannins seem to have fanned out, putting greater emphasis on this powerful Shiraz’s structure. As always, RWT was aged exclusively in French oak, where it spent 17 months (hogsheads, 70% new, 30% 1-y.o.).  14.5%

Penfolds Magill Estate Shiraz 2014 (Magill)

Vintage:  Above-average winter rainfall on the Magill Estate vineyard charged the soils, ensuring a good start to the growing season. Early budburst occurred as a result of a slightly drier and warmer start to spring. Temperatures were relatively cool during flowering, providing even fruit-set. A warm December and January ensured even and concentrated development of flavour and colour post veraison. The Magill Estate vineyard was handpicked on February 10th and 11th 2014, just prior to the significant rain episode on Valentine’s Day.

Tasting note: I was disappointed with this release of Magill (this bottle?)  In a single vineyard Shiraz I’m looking for a sense of place and detail.  I simply didn’t find it here.  The oak (it spent 18 months in new oak, 67% French, 33% American), even more so the oxidation of the maturation process (perhaps a not so snug cork?) seemed to  impact unduly on this wine.  It had a pronounced burnish of polished oak, with sarsaparilla accents and a toffeed, almost Bovril edge to the palate.  The fruit – dried blueberry/black olive – seemed a touch syrupy and overripe too.  All in all, this just seemed cooked to me.  14.5%,

Penfolds St Henri Shiraz 2013


Regional sourcing:
  McLaren Vale, Adelaide Hills, Barossa Valley, Clare Valley, Padthaway, Port Lincoln

Vintage: After a dry South Australian winter reminiscent of 2006, vines were in water deficit at the  beginning of spring and became accustomed to dry conditions quite early. Early budburst was a consistent theme across all regions within South Australia. Spring started with cool temperatures in the south east. The Barossa Valley enjoyed some warmer days, dispersed throughout October and November. Whilst canopies were small to moderate, they were healthy and balanced and contributed to even veraison and consequent ripening. Warmer temperatures were observed after the New Year and persisted throughout most of January, contributing to an early start to the 2013 harvest and a short, condensed vintage. Dry and warm conditions, coupled with lower than average yields in most regions resulted in Shiraz showing strong, structural tannins, wines of great intensity and intense flavour.

Tasting note: I loved the red-fruited 2012 and, in 2013, this black fruited blend of 96% Shiraz, 4% Cabernet ticks all the boxes too.  It’s a deep hue with a flashy waft of perfumed cassis on the nose and a sloopy, sensual ‘attack’ which captures the very essence of blackcurrant in terms of flavour, intensity and definition.  This St Henri has terrific concentration, persistence and line.  There’s a touch of high toned balsamic/soy to a finish which is nicely under-scored by a grainy, granular even, chassis of tannins.  With time in glass it reveals black raspberry and sweet cinnamon spice.  A touch of chocolate too.   It was aged for 12 months in 50+ y.o. large (1,460 litre) oak vats. Remarking that top vintages last as long as Grange, Gago observed that the ’71 St Henri is currently “superseding ’71 Grange, itself no slouch.”  14.5%

Penfolds Bin 389 Cabernet Shiraz 2014

Regional sourcing: Barossa Valley, Wrattonbully, McLaren Vale, Coonawarra

Vintage: Above-average winter and early spring rainfall offered the vines in South Australia healthy soil moisture profiles for the growing season. Late spring and summer were dry and warm with significant heat records being set. Warm weather prevailed during summer and throughout veraison, allowing grapes to develop evenly and with good intensity. These warm conditions came to an abrupt halt in the Barossa Valley and McLaren Vale in mid-February with significant rainfall allowing long slow ripening of the fruit in very good ripening conditions. Wrattonbully had a warm and generally dry ripening end to the season allowing development of strong varietal flavours.

Tasting note: Bin 389 is a personal favourite – a bottle of the ’86 which Gago showed at this year’s London re-corking clinic (report to follow) looked magnificent.  Plenty of tertiary complexity; plenty of life yet.  Gago says it has now overtaken Grange as Australia’s most cellared red.  It’s easy to see why in the 2014 as well as the ’86.  It’s a deep, deep hue.  Seriously opaque.  The nose is tight, the attack dry and firm.  It’s a gutsy wine with lots of chew – one might say iron fist in chainmail glove!  All coiled energy and tension, with flashes of the fruit which has yet to unfurl – perfumed mulberry, earthy blackcurrant and tighter still crunchy juniper berry and quince – textured, like the tannins.  Savoury (for Gago formic, for me soy-like) barrel ferment flavours abound and, with a whiff of volatile acidity – bring impetus and resonance to the gravelly, throaty finish I associate with this, Poor Man’s Grange, Bin 707 and Grange itself.  Charismatic, elemental even, if not yet fully formed; a sleeper.  It was aged for 12 months in American oak hogsheads (53% new, 27% 1-y.o., 20% 2-y.o.) 14.5

Penfolds Bin 707 Cabernet Sauvignon 2014

Regional sourcing:  Barossa Valley, Padthaway, Port Lincoln

Vintage:  Above-average winter and early spring rainfall offered the vines in South Australia healthy soil moisture profiles for the growing season. Significant rainfall in Padthaway continued throughout the month of October. Late spring and summer were dry and warm in the Barossa Valley with significant heat records being set. Padthaway experienced very windy conditions through an extended flowering period which led  to poor fruit-set. Warm weather continued through the summer in Barossa Valley and throughout veraison, allowing grapes to develop evenly and with good intensity. These conditions came to an abrupt halt on February 14th with a significant rainfall event slowing harvest. The remainder of the growing season was warm and dry. This ensured desired flavour development and acid retention resulting in impressive fruit quality.

Tasting note: Bin 707 is a unique take on Cabernet.  It’s not about restraint and elegance.  Rather it’s about full throttle, densely concentrated flavours and formidable structure – acid and tannin.  With a deep, inky hue, like Bin 369, this is a dense, chewy wine, with dusty cassis, assertive iron filing, savoury, mineral tannins and coconutty, American oak – great line and grip.   A gunpowder keg of flavour with a long, long touchpaper.  Don’t broach this for at least decade!  It was aged for 17 months in 100% new American oak hogsheads.  14.5%

Penfolds Grange 2012

Regional sourcing: Barossa Valley, McLaren Vale

Vintage: The Barossa Valley and McLaren Vale regions were impacted with lower than average rainfall across the winter period. This resulted in early budbreak in spring. Healthy and welcome spring rain ensued, merging with a mild summer with just a few short periods of heat. Mild daytime temperatures and cool evenings were observed across the Barossa Valley and McLaren Vale, allowing impressive flavour development without inflated baumés. Balanced canopies and crops provided even development throughout veraison across both regions. Bursts of warmth and dry conditions continued throughout harvest allowing fruit to be picked in optimal condition. Smaller berry and bunch sizes along with favourable weather conditions induced great results for traditional quality markers-colour, tannin profile, fruit concentration and flavour depth.

Tasting note: Penfolds Grange 2012 is a blend of 98% Shiraz, 2% Cabernet Sauvignon.  It’s a deep inky hue with flamboyant, perfumed (kid glove) oak to the nose and every sign that it is crammed to within an inch of its life with sweet, spicy fruit.  And so it is on a mouth-filling, Christmas cake palate, dense and brooding, with panforte notes already evident, as well as crushed raspberry as it opens up.  As Gago succinctly put it, it’s “an older style with modern day poise.” Grange 2012 certainly puts me in my mind of mature examples which I’ve tasted.  They flashed before me, lending the weight of history to this latest release.  And while, on one hand, the flavour profile and a certain smoothness makes it seem almost preternaturally mature (stylistically, I preferred the purer-fruited, juicily vibrant 2010), the 2014 feels much more energetic at point of release than the similarly mellow of flavour 2009.   Layered and expressive but with the legs to go the full Grange distance, the 2012 vintage is both penetrating and lingering, with terrific (gravelly and perfumed oak) back palate resonance. It was aged for 18 months in 100% new American oak hogsheads.    14.5%

To read my reports on previous releases of The Penfolds Collection follow these links:

The Penfolds Collection 2015

Penfolds Luxury & Icon Collection 2014

The Penfolds Collection 2013

The Penfolds Bin Release 2013

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